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Full text of "Stetson Oracle"

STETSON 
ORACLE 




'9 2^5 



<£ 



2. 



J? CLASS 



PLAY NUMBER 



I 



£ 



5* 



Telephone: Office: 0416-M Office Closed Monday 

Home: 0300-R 



HERMAN N. SMITH, D. M. D. 

Evenings and Sundays by Appointment 



331 No. Main Street Randolph 



Compliments of 



Richards & Brennan Co. 




HOWARD & CALDWELL 

Men's, Young Men's and Boys' Clothing 



*• •* 



36 Main Street, Corner of Ward Brockton, Mass. 



The Blanchard Print. a^g^> 16 School St., Brockton, Mass. 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



DAK 

High - grade De- 
veloping Print- 
ing. Brownie 
Cameras, Films 
and Supplies. 
Eaton, Crane & 
Pike Stationery. 

H. C. WOODWARD, %££& 





M. B. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



C. F. LYONS 



BROCKTON COKE 

CLEAN 

CONVENIENT 

ECONOMICAL 



LEAVE ORDERS AT RANDOLPH OFFICE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. E. O'BRIEN 

PLUMBING AND HEATCNG 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



"SONNY" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Frank C. Walsh 



g^l^P 



The Store with the 
Green Front 



TURNER FREE LIBRARY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



M. E. LEAHY 



GURNEY BROS. COMPANY 

ESTABLISHED 1841^ 

122 MAIN STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Cartwright & Hurley 



MAIN STREET 



RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 



Randolph Garage Co. 





Authorized 
Ford Dealers 



Watches and Clocks of all Kinds Repaired 

John A. Jacobson 

14 SHORT STREET RANDOLPH, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



JAMES H. DUNPHY 



\miggP. 



Compliments of 



amn Pfyarmary 



Compliments of 



Kmntbys ©rrijeatra 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

F. W. HARRIS 

TRUCKING 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



ftorfer'a ftyarmarg 



Compliments of 

W. M. HOWARD 

Fish and Oysters 



Compliments of 

Mr. S. A. FOSTER, Manager 
AXPT. CO. 



Compliments of 

A. ROHLFS 

Marat 



MILL STREET 



RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 



F. J. CURRAN 

High Grade 
PLUMBING & HEATING 




DAVID J. GOOD, Jr. WALTER J. GOOD 

School Every Day 
We PLOW the Way 
The Tractor Snow Plow 

GOOD SERVICE MOTOR SALES 

771263 

£ ~~/ *r " 7 / Compliments of 

Ae> GEORGE E. PYNE 

Sow. 

^l Meats and Provisions 



Compliments of 



ESTEN C. SOULE 

WOOD 



Randolph 327-W 



T. CURTIS HARRIOTT ' WALTER F. HARRIOTT 



HARRIOTT CO. 



47 WINTER STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

TELEPHONE BEACH 3324 




Vol. XII, No. 2 Stetson High School, Randolph, Mass. Feb. 1925 



SINGLE COPIES TWENTY CENTS 



Editor-in-Chief Dorothy Brennan 
Assistant Editor . . .George Bossi 
Business Managers 
Randolf Philbrook, Ruth Powers 

Jokes Rose Sullivan 

Exchanges Ellen Peterson 

Alumni Mary Nugent 

Athletics Joseph Campbell 

Editorial Annie Bates 

Literary Mary Sullivan 

School Notes 

Emmaline McGerrigle 

Faculty Advisors Miss Shaw 

Mr. Leavitt 



EDITORIAL 



The Class of 1925 presents this 
issue of the Oracle in connection 
with its class play "And Home 
Came Ted." Rehearsals began be- 
fore Christmas, and the play ought 
to be in good shape by January 30. 
The play is fully up to the stand- 
ard of former years, and we hope 
to put out the "standing room" 
sign. We feel that a class play 
ought not to be taken too serious- 
ly. If the action of the play is 
mainly humorous, so much the bet- 
ter. We do not aspire to Shakes- 
peare. Mrs. Gove deserves a whole 
lot of credit for her splendid coach- 
ing. 



Greetings From the Class of 1925 

This year's graduating class has 

not been faced with the most favor- 



able circumstances during the 
present year, owing to the enforced 
stay in the Town Hall. Yet it is 
said that true greatness thrives on 
adversity. Just how we are thriv- 
ing will not be proved until June, 
but all signs point to the conclusion 
that we will graduate the largest 
class in the history of the school. 
It has been the practice for each 
year's Senior Class to present a 
play in order to raise money to 
defray the graduating expenses. 
During the drive for the Athletic 
Fund, our class treasury has been 
rather neglected, so it is impera- 
tive, really, for us to make our 
play a success. 

But it is not for financial rea- 
sons alone that the performance 
is staged. It has become an insti- 
tution in the town. Each year the 
Hall is filled practically to capa- 
city, and sometimes people are 
turned away at the doors. So the 
Class of 1925 wish to thank all 
their friends who were so generous 
in contributions to the Athletic 
Fund, those who advertised in the 
Oracle, and all those who are so 
kind as to attend our presentation 
tonight. We sincerely hope that 
everyone will enjoy the play, and 
we most certainly appreciate the 
interest that our friends have 
shown. 

Francis Leahy, 

President of the Senior Class. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 




A Laboratory Love Song 

Oh, come where the Cyanides si- 
lently flow, 

And the Carburets droop on the 
Oxides below, 

Where the rays of Potassium glow 
on the hill 

And the song of the Silicate never 
is still! 

Come, oh come, 
Tumti, turn, turn, 

Peroxide of Soda and Uranium. 



When Alcohol's a liquid at thirty 

degrees, 
And no chemical change can affect 

Manganese, 

When Alkalies flourish, and Acids 
are free, 

My heart shall be constant, sweet 
Science, to thee! 

Yes, to thee, 
Mn, 0, P, 

Zinc, Borax, and Bismuth and 
HO + C. 

George Bossi, '25. 



Major Stetson 

Tune "Lord Jeffrey Amherst" 
Old Stetson High was founded by 
the Major true and bold, 
Cheer for Stetson, yes Stetson 
High; 
For he surely was a mighty man 
in those brave days of old, 
And he never stopped to fear or 

sigh, 

No we never stop to fear or sigh, 

'T was in the war of eighteen 

twelve he fought with all his 

might, 

To drive his foes right off the 

sea; 
■Afa&&m4b& ve -all his- foes 'right 

Now when he built old Stetson Hall 
he did the thing just right, 
And he founded Stetson High 
for you and me. 

CHORUS 

Oh Stetson, Fair Stetson, 

There is fame in thy name for- 
evermore, - 
We wll rally for Stetson, 

And we'll sing her praises o'er 
and o'er. 

'25. 



When the Flag Goes By 



When the Flag is passing by, 
When we see its colors fly, 
Every stripe and every star 
Sends a message near and far 
As the Flag is passing by. 
Proudly borne by Boys in Blue, 
And in France by Yankees true, 
Not a stain has ever marred 
That old Flag all battle-scarred, 
With its red and white and blue. 



'Twas the Flag of Washington, 
And it tells of victories won 
By the heroes one and all 
Who have answered Freedom's call, 
When Old Glory beckoned on. 
That old Flag must still advance 
And we pledge allegiance 
To the Flag and to the land 
Where fair Freedom's altars stand 
Guarded by our vigilance. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



a 


IGiterarg 


a 



VITAMINES 



The most startling discovery in 
relation to food and nutrition 
made in modern times relates to 
certain subtle substances to which 
the name "vitamines" has been 
given. These substances are 
found in foods in such minute 
quantities that they have so tar 
escaped chemical analysis, but 
their properties have been deter- 
mined accurately by various ex- 
periments and observations, and 
knowledge concerning them has 
come to hold a very important 
place in the science of nutrition. 

Vitamines are absolutely e3sen- 
tial to health and life. Three dif- 
ferent vitamines are known — fat 
solulile A, water-solulile B, and 
water-solulile C. If any one of 
them is lacking, or is deficient in 
the food, the body languishes and 
is subject to various nutritional 
diseases. 

Vitamine A . promotes the 
growth of young children and in 
its absence rickets often appear. 



This vitamine is found in butter, 
cream, egg yolk, and cod liver 
oil. It is also found in great 
abundance in greens of all sorts. 
The lack of vitamine A will in- 
crease the susceptibility to infec- 
tion. 

Vitamine B is found in wheat, 
bran, yeast, and yeast extracts. 
When this vitamine is absent neu- 
ritis and the nutritional disease 
known as beri-beri appear. 

Vitamine C is found in fresh 
fruit and vegeables. This vita- 
mine is often destroyed by cook- 
ing and the importance of using 
some fresh uncooked foods daily 
is readily seen. The lack of this 
vitamine often results in the dis- 
ease known as scurvy. 

If food in sufficient amounts 
and variety is taken regularly 
such special preparations as yeast 
cakes will not be necessary for 
the diet. 

Dorothy B. Conway. 



Human Interest in Art 



It is in Gothic Art especially 
that we find the artistic imagina- 
tion at work, carving the story of 
the lives of the people into the 
huge piles of masonry. All over 
Europe we find Gothic Cathedrals, 
delicate almost to the degree of 
perfection in France, but equally 
beautiful in England. Each town 
competed with those neighboring, 
to have the most beautiful church. 
In this manner the best efforts 
were employed to the great 
advancement of Art. Always the 
cathedral is the center of interest, 



rising above all other buildings. 
Into the walk of the cathedral it- 
self we found the tiny homes of 
the poor built, as if for protection. 
So life too centered about it. In 
the decoration we find intimate 
daily life expressed, a doctor band- 
aging a cut hand, a baker mixing 
bread, and other characters from 
various walks of life. Today in 
our country, modern architects 
are going back to these Gothic 
times for inspiration, and are try- 
ing to reproduce in our modern 
churches, the same human interest. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



WE WONDER? 



Why Bossi is such a woman- 
hater? How about it Barbara ? 

Why Joe Campbell does all the 
shadow boxing on Roel Street 
at night? 

If Sonny Dolan ever forgets his 
manners? 

Why Rose takes auto numbers? 

What stonewalls around the cem- 
etery would say if they talked? 
Don't get scared Brownie, they 
can't. 

Why Dockendorff's hair is curly 
some days ? 



Where John Clark learned to 

play Pool? 
What you think of our scorekeep- 

er? James Mc. 
Why Charlie Swain never teases? 
Why Mary likes Studebakers? 
If Goody lives up to his name? 
How it would seem if Daly wasn't 

sarcastic? 
Why Em. likes store clerks? 
Why Billy Almond is such a 

Shiek? 
Why Lunt is such a heartbreak- 

er? 
How you like our president? 

Leahy. 



l Our Assembly Room" 



Although we have no ideal class 
rooms this year, we have> an ex- 
cellent assembly room and have 
taken advantage of it, especially 
on Friday noons. We have had 
moving pictures fom the Yale Uni- 
versity Historical series. 

The first one, "Montcalm and 
Wolfe," the story of the struggle 
between the French and English 
for Canada. Another one of the 
series was "The Settlement of 
Jamestown," the story of John 
Smith and Pocohontas. The last 
one of the series which we enjoyed 
the most was "The Winning of the 
West," which is considered to be 
the best one of the historical pic- 
tures, 

At these shows the pupils of the 
Junior High School were our 

guests. We are very grateful to 

Mr. McMahon and Mr. Brady for 

their cooperation in these pictures. 

Friday December 19, we had the 
pleasure of listening to Christmas 
stories by Mrs. Cronin from the 
Boston Public Library. 



Late in October we were enter- 
tained by Mr. Simpson from the 
State Department of Education, 
who gave an interesting talk on the 
difference between practical and 
cultural subjects and how they 
were balanced in a school curricu- 
lum. 

On January 9 Mr. Corey from 
Burdett College gave an interest- 
ing and instructive talk on "Mem- 
ory" which we all enjoyed very 
much. 

January 16, the Wells Instru- 
mental Four from Brockton enter- 
tained us at our noon assembly. 

We look forward to these Friday 
assemblies with pleasure. 

Emm aline McGerrigle. 



Trouble never dodges anyone 
who is looking for it. 

The coldest place in town is the 
cemetery. Thousands below. 

Notice— Santa Claus was mur- 
dered Christmas Day ! 

To the Freshies — Never run in 
case of fire. Green things never 
burn ! 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



WORKING OUT A CROSS- 
WORD PUZZLE 

Characters 

Mr. Deane — A man who craves 
cross-word puzzles. 

Mrs. Deane — A carefree wife. 

The Burglar — Proves to be a 
cross-word solver. 

Officer Kelly — A cop of the 
neighborhood. 

Synopsis — After spending the 
evening on a cross-word puzzle 
the Deanes retire, leaving the re- 
mainder of the puzzle to be 
solved on the morrow. 

Act I. Scene I. : Bedroom of the 
Deanes. Mrs. Deane suddenly 
awakening — "John, John, wake 
up, there's a man down stairs. 
John ! a burglar, wake up." 

John answering drowsily — 
"What is the matter, dear?" 

Mrs. Deane — "There's a man 
down stairs." 

John — "Have no fear, dear, I 
have my automatic," and John 
starts downstairs. 

Scene II. The living room of 
the Deanes. A man seated at the 
table, head bent low, thinking 
hard. Enter Mr. Deane, gun in 
hand. 

Mr. Deane (in a loud voice) — 
"Hands up! Say stranger, what 
do you mean breaking into my 
house this time of the night?" 

Burglar — "Say, old man, what 
is an old Danish king of four let- 
ters, this 34 vertical sure is a 
tough one?" 

John (dumbfounded) — "That 
same one stuck me, too.' Draw- 
ing a chair over 10 the table he 
sets to thinking. 

Mrs. Deane, thinking John had 
been overcome by the burglar 
comes into the room, and on see- 
ing John sitting with the burglar, 
she is dumbfounded. 

Mrs. Deane, recovering — "John 
what do you mean by staying 
down here so long, when you 
should be in bed?' 



John (taking no notice of her 
remark) — "Alice dear, what is an 
elongated snakelike fish of three 
letters?" 

Mrs. Deane utters a cry of de- 
spair, goes to the window and 
succeeds in calling the attention 
of an officer on beat. 

Enter Officer Kelly (billy in 
hand) — "Which man is your hus- 
band ma'am? " 

Mr. Deane and the forlorn 
tramp both dancing and crying 
with joy — "I got 34 vertical and 
I got 14 horizontal." 

Quieting down, the tramp says 
— "But we have a lot to get yet." 

Dr. Deane and the burglar sit 
down again at the table and be- 
gin to concentrate. 

Officer Kelly looks at Mrs. 
Deane, Mrs. Deane looks at the 
officer, and the cop throws up his 
hands and starts to walk out. 

The tramp — "I say, officer, 
what is a word for a Chinese lot- 
tery game of three letters ending 
in Z?" 

The cop stops, thinks hard and 
shakes his head. 

The telephone rings, Mrs. 
Deane answers. "Mr. Kelly? 
Yes, he is right here; just a min- 
ute." 

After a few words on the 
phone, Officer Kelly hangs up and 
says: "It was only the chief; he 
is working on a puzzle and he is 
stuck on a word of three letters 
meaning meadow. He says I'm 
off duty for the rest of the night 
as Officer McGowan is on duty 
now. If you would consent (to 
Mrs. Deane) I would be only too 
glad to help on the cross-word 
puzzle." 

Mrs. Deane — "Bring over a 
chair and make yourself at 
heme." 

Officer, Mr. and Mrs. Deane 
seated at the table, all talking 
aloud at the same time. 
Curtain. Louis Baxter, 1926. 



10 



THE STETSON ORACLE 




Senior Notes 

The Class of 1925 elected officers 
in September, with the following 
appointments: President, Francis 
Leahy; Vice-President, Rose Sulli- 
van; Secretary, Robert Minot; 
Treasurer, Joseph Donovan. 

Mary Evans was appointed 
Treasurer of the Penny Collection 
Fund. 

Creditable work has been done by 
Miss Rose Sullivan and Miss Dor- 
othy Brennan, who have charge of 
our school lunch. They have de- 
voted their recesses tor the past 
two terms to preparing and selling 
the lunch. Considering the present 
conditions the Lunch Fund has 
progressed. The present sum is 
$60. 

The Football Boys tendered the 
Hockey Girls a reception Hallow- 
e'en night. 

We are fortunate in having the 
boys of the school orchestra in our 
class. They have played for us 
several times and are unusually 
good players. 

The Senior Class are taking 
Shorthand Dictation speed at the 
rate of 85 words a minute. In 
September the speed was 70 and 
in June we expect it to be 100 
words per minute on new material. 
This year, owing to the fire of June 
19, we have 19 new typewriters; 
10 Underwoods and 9 Remingtons. 
The regular Underwood and Rem- 
ington Monthly Awards tests have 
already been given. Several of 
the Seniors have been successful 
so soon. It is the aim of the Senior 
Typewriting Class and the Sten- 
ography teacher to be the first 
100% Typewriting Class, by all 



the members receiving either a 
Typewriting Certificate or a Med- 
al. 



Junior Notes 



The Class of 1926 elected its 
officers in September with the fol- 
lowing results: President, Louis 
Baxter; Vice President, Dorothy 
Gavin, Secretary, Walter Duffy; 
Treasurer, Elizabeth Riley. 

The class is well represented in 
athletics, both in field hockey and 
baseball. 

The Juniors want to know: 

Why Dot Gavin likes skating? 

Why Martha Foley wants to be 
called Lee? What's his last name 
Martha? 

Why Duffy stays uptown 
nights? (Magnetic attractions?) 

How we're going to tender the 
Seniors a reception? No money! 

Who Elizabeth is interested in? 
Hmm. 

Why Barbara doesn't wear 
gloves any more? Ask George, 
he knows. 

Why Louie likes to coast on No. 
Street? Do you know, Dot? 

What Mary Connors thinks of 
Skeet? 



Lunt — "I can't get any speed 
out of that auto you sold me; you 
told me you had been arrested five 
times in it." 

Brown — "So I was, for obstruct- 
ing the traffic." 



* * 



Miss Knight, after explaining 
geometry problem — "Are there 
any questions?" 

Boothby — "Yes, how do you do 
it?" 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



11 



School Notes 

In the contest conducted by the 
Norfolk Lumber Co. of Stoughton 
for the best set of plans submitted 
by a pupil in the Stetson High 
School, George Bossi of the Senior 
Class was awarded the prize, $20 
in gold. 

This fall the Randolph & Hol- 
brook Electric Light and Power 
Co. conducted a contest relative to 
the proper lighting of our homes. 
In this contest Robert Minot of 
the Senior Class was awarded a 
bicycle. Helen Sims of the Sopho- 
more Class, a pair of shoe skates; 
Edna Benvie of the Freshman 
Class, a fountain pen. 

In September our school faculty 
was increased to ten regular teach- 
ers. The new teachers, we are 
pleased to state, are Miss Knight 
and Miss King. 

We boast the largest school ban- 
ner in the State, 40 feet long, bear- 
ing the inscription ''Stetson High 
1925." 

Afternoon sessions have been 
very popular this year. Why? 

The Hudson River picture, given 
by the Class of 1903, has been re- 
placed by a beautiful picture of 
the Capitol at Washington. The 
picture is eighty inches long and 
of the same size as the original. 

We have brought only two sec- 
ondary clocks to Stetson Hall from 
the school. These are controlled 
by our master clock in room H. 

Stetson Hall has been heated to 
our satisfaction. 

Stetson High School sent a tele- 
gram of sympathy to Principal 
Boyden of the Bridgewater Nor- 
mal- School upon hearing of the 
fire. 

Emmaline McGerrigle. 



Alumni Notes 

Five graduates of 1924 are at 
Bridgewater Normal School. 
They are; the Misses Laura Rent, 
Lillian Forrest, Katharine Dolan ; 
Mr. Frank Dillon, and Albert Mur- 
phy. 

Cyril Powderly, 1924, is going to 
Thayer Academy. 

Barbara Belcher, 1924, is em- 
ployed in the Randolph Trust Com- 
pany. 

Alice Dorey, 1924, is a stenog- 
rapher in the office of the Strout 

Leslie Bailey, 1924, is working 
for the Shawmut Bank, Boston. 
Agency. 

Martin Young, 1913, is in com- 
plete charge of the E. C. Young 
Portable Building Company. 

Russell Williard, 1908, former 
Dartmouth Varsity pitcher, 
stopped here for a few days re- 
cently. 

Miss Katherine Hill is an Eng- 
lish teacher in the Bridgewater 
Normal School. 

The photo of the Class of 1910, 
destroyed by the fire, has been re- 
placed by Mrs. Frank Teed. 

Miss Amy Campbell, 1922, is 
a teacher at the Whitman High 
School. 

The Class of 1924 gave a dance 
for the benefit of the School's Ath- 
letic Fund. 

Mary Nugent. 



Rohlfs — "Are all teachers book- 
worms?" 

Neary — "No, Geometry teachers 
are not." 

Rohlfs — "How is that?" 

Neary — "They are angle 
worms," 

* * * 

Miss Shaw — "Name a collective 
noun." 

McLaughlin — "Vacuum clean- 
er." 



12 THE STETSON ORACLE 

" And Home Came Ted " 

By 

Class of 1925— Stetson High 

STETSON HALL, RANDOLPH 
Friday Evening, January 30, 1925 

Characters 

(In the order of their appearance.) 

SKEET KELLY, the Clerk .... Joseph P. Campbell 

DIANA GARWOOD, the Heiress . . . Dorothy E. Brennan 

MISS LOGANBERRY, the Spinster . . Rose E. Sullivan 

IRA STONE, the Villain Leopold A. Kangiser 

AUNT JUBILEE, the Cook George J. Daly 

MR. MAN, the Mystery ..... William J. Almond 
JIM RYKER, the Lawyer ..... Edward J. Dolan 
MOLLIE MACKLIN, the Housekeeper . . . Annie E. Bates 
HENRIETTA DARBY, the Widow . . . Mary E. Sullivan 

TED, the Groom • George P. Bossi 

ELSIE, the Bride . Laura M. Hill 

SENATOR M'CORKLE, the Father . . . Francis J. Leahy 

Scene: The office and reception room of the Rip Van Winkle Inn in 
the Catskill Mountains. 

Act I. An afternoon in April. What happened to Ted? 
Act II. The same night. Who was the burglar? 
Act III. The next morning. Who was Mr. Man? 

Under the direction of Mrs. Minnie L. Gove. 

Kennedy's Orchestra Dancing till 1 o'clock 

All seats reserved, 50 cents 



THE STETSON ORACLE 13 

A Few Facts About the Cast 

Joseph Campbell shows some clever acting in the part of Skeet, 
the Boy from the East Side of New York. Watch for Skeet in the dress 
suit. 

Dorothy Brennan, the heiress of the play, has a chance to display 
some clothes, and hauteur too. 

Rose Sullivan plays the part of a kittenish old maid, with the ready 
humor characteristic of Rose. 

Leopold Kangiser, our play villain, had to acquire a villainous man- 
ner, such a contrast to his own easy disposition. 

George Daly, will be sure to delight the audience with his humor- 
ous part. He has a chance to display his ready wit in the form of 
Aunt Jubilee. 

William Almond, the courteous, ever-gentlemanly "Mr. Man," has 
a wonderful chance to practice his "pet expressions." The poor 
misunderstood hero comes to his own at last. 

Edward Dolan, who has so recently come to this class, is sure to 
make a hit in the part of Jim Ryker. He has the assurance that brings 
success. 

Annie Bates, the victim of an unfortunate love affair, certainly 
has a long, hard part to learn. She mastered it in a very creditable 
manner. 

Mary Sullivan, "The Honolulu Widow," sings sweetly to all the 
"eligibles" in sight. Here's hoping she doesn't acquire the habit! 

George Bossi doesn't find the course of married life very smooth, 
and we hope that there's truth in the saying, "True love never runs 
smooth." 

Laura Hill, the "Sob Sister" of our play, has sobbed faithfully for 
three nights a week for seven weeks. She does it to perfection now. 

Francis Leahy, the irate father, discloses the identity of the real 
Ted, after a brief struggle over his daughter's matrimonial tangle. 

Dorothy Brennan, '25. 



A Resume of the Play Catskill Mountains and the plot 

"And Home Came Ted" is a deals with a struggle for suprem- 

sprightly comedy of mystery in ac ^ m a furniture company be- 

which there is an abundance of tween Ted, the rightful heir, and 

fun without any impropriety or one Ira Stone, an unscrupulous 

offense. The story is thrilling and adventurer, who is trying to gain 

the interest of the audience is held con trol of the business. G. B. '25 
from beginning to end by a series 
of dramatic situations rising from 

one climax to another until the Miss Conwav— "When do the 

fa?t^t n ° Uement ^ the d ° Se ° f the leaves begin t0 turn? " 

The action of the comedy occurs Class in unison — "The night be- 
at the Rip Van Winkle Inn in the fore exams." 



14 



THE STETSON ORACLE 




By Joseph Campbell 

Many of the promising players 
for the team next spring are those 
who played in the fall season 
games. The prospective pitchers 
are : Cy. Baxter, Walter Duffy, 
and Ed. Dolan, who will do the 
pitching, with Joe Campbell do- 
ing the catching. 

All the equipment was de- 
stroyed by the fire. A few suits 
and complete equipment for the 
catcher were bought this fall. 

This fall we took on a new op- 
ponent, Sharon High School, and 
defeated them in two games by 
large scores. We also defeated 
Avon and West Bridgewater this 
fall. 

We are fortunate to have such 
men as Mr. Chapin, Mr. Powder- 
ly and Mr. Leavitt, in coaching 
our baseball team. They have 
given us inside dope of the game. 
Mr. Chapin, formerly of Dart- 
mouth, was a first class athlete in 
his college days. Mr. Powderly 
is a graduate of Holy Cross Col- 
lege and a great worker for the 
ball team and the school. Mr. 
Leavitt is a graduate of Dart- 
mouth College, and took part in 
class athletics. Mr. Leavitt is in 
full charge of the second team. 
When it comes to keeping account 
of the batting and fielding aver- 
ages it is hard to beat our official 
scorer, James McLaughlin. 



The Girls' Hockey Team flour- 
ished during the Fall. They have 
many capable players. The girls 
hope to win in the future. 

The Girls' Basketball Team 
practiced Friday, Jan. 8th in the 
Y. W. C. A. The team looks very 
promising. We hope they suc- 
ceed. 

It looks doubtful for the boys' 
basketball team. We are willing 
to lend a few good players for a 
boys' basketball team, to any 
school who will lend us a gym. 
We have the material but no place 
to play. All dressed up and no 
place to go. 

Basketball is a good game for 
the Dentists; Francis knows. 

We have the best recess 
grounds in New England — the 
road and the neighbors ' yards. 
Football 

In the Fall the Juniors and Sen- 
iors played a few games of foot- 
ball. The greater part of the 
games were won by the Seniors. 
The first-try out was won by the 
Seniors having a score of 30 to 
18. In this game Almond and 
Baxter with Goody excelled in 
pass work. Almond led in scor- 
ing with three touchdowns to his 
credit. Baxter got the touch- 
downs for the Juniors. 

A week later v/e had another 
game which the Seniors won with 
a victory of 36 to 9. Our time- 
keeper, James McLaughlin, was 
always on his toes. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



15 




The Radiator. Somerville High 
School, Somerville, Mass. 

We like your magazine and think 
that the stories and poems are 
especially interesting. 

The Echo. Canton High School, 
Canton, Mass. 

Your paper is interesting. You 
seem to be fine on athletics. 

The Imp. Brighton High School, 
Brighton, Mass. 

Your poetry is good, We like 
your Novembel* cover design very 
much. 

The Argus. Crosby High 
School, Waterbury, Conn. 

Your paper is liked very much. 
Where is your exchange depart- 
ment? 

The Pengry Record. Pengry 
School, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Would not a few jokes and an 
exchange department improve your 
paper? 

Cohurn Clarion. Coburn Classi- 
cal Institute, Waterville, Mass. 

We find your paper very good 
reading. We especially like your 
cuts and cover design. 



We also wish to espress our 
thanks for the following ex- 
changes. 

The Waxa Beacon. Waxahachie 
High School, Waxahachie, Texas. 

The Newtonite. Newton High 
School, Newtonville, Mass. 

The Spectator. Federalsburg 
High School, Federalsburg, Mary- 
land. 

The Broadcast. Everett Senior 
High School, Everett, Mass. 

The Beacon. Newport News 
High School, Newport News, Va. 

The Echo. Winthrop High 
School, Winthrop, Mass. 

The Early Trainer. Essex 
County Training School, Lawrence, 
Mass. 

The Oracle. Bangor High 
School, Bangor, Maine. 
One of the best. 

The Mentor. Mass. State Pris- 
on, Charlestown, Mass. 

Boston University News. Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Ellen Peterson, '25 



NOTE 

We are at a great disadvantage 
this year because there is no place 
where the boys and girls may prac- 
tice basketball. It is especially 
disappointing to the girls who 
would have had a great team if a 
hall had been available. No team 
can make much progress at any 
game without the advantages of 
a home floor. Last year both girls 
and boys had a good season in bas- 
ketball, and in the case of the girls 



the outlook was very bright, until 
the fire put our building out of 
commission. 



Columbus on reaching the shores 
of America was greeted by the 
chief of a band of Indians and was 
much impressed by the feathers in 
his head band. 

"Say," drawled he, "will you 
please tell me what you wear those 
feathers for?" 

"Sure," replied the Indian chief, 
"to keep my 'wig-warm'." 



16 



THE STETSON ORACLE 




Mr. Powderly — "How do you 
address the Secretary of the Na- 
vy?" 

Boyle — "Y our Warship, of 

course/' 

* * * 

Laura — "If you don't stop look- 
ing in that mirror you'll be con- 
ceited." 

Eunice — "Don't worry. I don't 
think I'm half as pretty as I really 

am." 

* * * 

Miss Giblin — "Do you smoke 
Joseph?" 

Joseph Campbell — "Does a duck 
swim?" 



FAVORITE SAYINGS OF OUR 

TEACHERS 

Miss Allen — Pay your Penny Col- 
lection! 

Miss Brennan — Speak now, or 
never. 

Mr. Chapin — I speak man- fash- 
ion. 

Miss King — Afternoon session. 

Miss Knight — What do you think 
you've got here? 

Miss Shaw — This is scarcely Eng- 
lish. 

Miss Giblin — Stop talking. 

Miss Conway — Act like Seniors ! 

Mr. Powderly — Grow up ! 

Mr. Leavitt — Come on, now. 



In answer to an ad, the following 
reply was received: Gentlemen, I 
noticed your ad in the paper for 
organist and choir leader, either 
lady or gentleman, and having 
been both for several years, I ask 
for the appointment. 



The teacher was giving a lesson 
on "gravity." 

"I want you to understand," she 
said, "that it is the law of gravity 
that keeps us on this earth." 

"Please, miss," asked little Nel- 
lie, "how did we stick on before 
the law was passed?" 



"Buy a trunk," said the dealer, 

"And what for should I buy a 
trunk?" said Pat. 

"To put your clothes in," he re- 
plied. 

"And go naked," cried he. Be- 
gorra I won't." 



Desperate Suitor — "I'll give you 
a quarter if you'll get me a lock of 
your sister's hair." 

Small Brother — "Make it a dol- 
lar and I'll get the whole bunch of 
it for you. I know where she 
hangs it." 



THE STETSON ORACLE 17 



EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF 
THE STETSON HIGH SCHOOL 

The fire of June 19, 1924 made it necessary to find temporary 
quarters for the school. The selection of Stetson Hall as an emergency 
home was probably the best possible solution of the problem ; no other 
building offered so many conveniences and so few disadvantages. We 
have tried to keep in mind this year that we are passing through a 
phase of our school life which will be comparatively brief, and to make 
the very best of the situation. Our teachers and pupils alike unite in 
the verdict that Stetson Hall has proved to be a very satisfactory build- 
ing for our use. It has been a matter of agreeable surprise to us to 
find that our school activities can go on without any serious interup- 
tion, even though our surroundings have been so unusual. The town 
officials have given us a cordial welcome, and our thanks are due to 
them for their forbearance and courtesy. The use of the G. A. R. rooms 
has been particularly acceptable to our teachers, who wish to assure 
the veterans that the consideration shown by Horace G. Niles Post 
No. 110 has been a source of constant satisfaction. Stetson Hall was 
not, of course, built for a school-house, and after the good things we 
have said about our present quarters, it may seem paradoxical to ac- 
knowledge that some inconveniences have been experienced. Little, 
however, would be gained by mentioning here the instances where we 
have been somewhat at a disadvantage by the lack of many things 
which are to be expected in a modern high school building. It is 
enough to say that everyone is looking on the bright side of the picture, 
and that we are anticipating better school accommodations in the com- 
ing year. 

Our Senior class numbers 39, the largest in the history of the 
school. The registration this year to date has been 217, as compared 
with 215 last year. The State Board of Education, during the summer 
vacation, refused to approve the school unless the minimum number 
of teachers for a school of our size was provided. This minimum 
was one teacher for every 25 pupils, or fraction thereof, exclusive of 
the principal. Two additional teachers have therefpre been employed 
this year, making our total number of regular teachers ten, the least 
number which would meet the requirement of the State Board. Many 
schools of our size employ more than ten regular teachers. All the 
teachers who were with us last year returned in September, and to 
this fact may be ascribed much of the smoothness which has charac- 
terized our school sessions in Stetson Hall. We have had a remarkably 
efficient corps of teachers during the past two years. 

Horace Partridge Co. 

Mfrs. ATHLETIC and SPORTING GOODS 

Franklin Street, Boston 

Athletic Outfitters of Stetson High School 



The name "Wright & Ditson 



99 



Insures the Best in Quality and fairness in price. 

We have had Stetson High School as customers for 
over twenty-five years 




344 Washington Street, Boston 



E. L. McAuliffe 
Newsdealers 

Ice Cream Candy Cigars 



• • • 

• • • 



Main St., Randolph 



Compliments of 



H. W. FRENCH 



Gtyf priure £>tyap, 

Incorporated 



65 Bromfield St., Boston, Mass. 

UP FOUR STEPS 

Telephone, Congress 2093 



CAMPBELL 



*• • 



The 
Auto Sign Painter 



MAIN ST. 



OPP. PLEASANT 



Compliments of 



Fred W. Montsce Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF WELL KNOWN 

"Park Square" and "Howard" Cigars 



James W. Brine Co. 

The Best in Baseball, Football, Tennis and 
Hockey Equipment 

ATHLETIC OUTFITTERS 

286 Devonshire St. Boston, Mass. 




Itbleiic Goods 



[ATHLETIC -■» |i» l SUPPlltS 




286 Devonshire Jt Boston Mass, 



THE 

HIGHEST QUALITY 
ATHLETIC GOODS 

MANUFACTURED 



Compliments of 



BAKER'S MARKET 



George H. Eddy 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Cor. Main and Liberty Sts. Randolph, Mass. 

C. A. LYMAN 

OTatrtjeiJ, ffilorkfi unit 3teui?lrg ISepatou 

Diamonds reset with new mountings. Old wedding rings made over to new style. 

Diamonds Cleaned Free of Charge. 



E. C. Young Co. 

Garages 

Portable Buildings 
Poultry Houses 



WARREN STREET near Depot 
RANDOLPH 



Compliments of 

H. N. Smith 

Groceries and Meats 



Cor. WEST and MAIN Sts. 



Special Prices on all Suits and Overcoats during Jan. and Feb. 

BOSSI; The Tailor 

Ran. 427-M Randolph, Mass. 



Richard F. McAuliffe 



MEATS 



Tel. 0472-W 

Thomas J. Salamone 

The Shoe and Rubber Man 

Res. 169 Warren Street 

Business Address 
Main Street, Randolph 



NED 



Mrs. Grace Worden Engle 



Residence Studio: Downtown Studio 

39 LAFAYETTE STREET 73 BELCHER STREET 

Telephone Randolph 0527-M 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



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(Par Marie Allen) 

"Resolvez en Francais" 



Horizontal 



Vertical 



1. 


Partir. 


1. 


Affection. 


5. 


Tentative. 


2. 


Quelquechose a boire. 


10. 


Partie du bras. 


3. 


Ce qui reste au fond. 


12. 


Une terminaison de l'imparfait de 


4. 


Preposition ou pronom. 




l'indicatif. 


6. 


Conjonction. 


13. 


Un grand oiseau, bon a manger. 


7. 


La joie d'un enfant. 


14. 


Une piece d'argent. 


8. 


Un nom de fille. 


16. 


Le pluriel d'"un." 


9. 


Resultat, fin. 


17. 


Pour que, afin que. (Latin) 


11. 


Sache. 


18. 


Une servante. 


14. 


Adjectif possessif. 


20. 


Partie du verbe "avoir." 


15. 


Article indefini. 


21. 


lis font une donation. 


18. 


Caisse. 


23. 


Ce qu'on voit au ciel. 


19. 


Hades. 


27. 


Pronom personnel conjoint. 


22. 


Une saison. 


29. 


Voyage d'un oiseau. 


24. 


J'ai le courage. 


30. 


Adjectif possessif. 


25. 


Portion. 


31. 


11 n'est pas mort. 


26. 


Un plan geographic. 


33. 


Partie du verbe "etre." 


28. 


Faire la lecture. 


34. 


Conjonction. 


30. 


Adverbe de quantite. 


35. 


Le dieu d'amour. (Grec.) 


32. 


Pronom personnel disjoint. 


37. 


Adverbe de quantite. 


34. 


Question, etat, cause. 


38. 


La femme du roi. 


36. 


Abbreviation pour "sans nom." 


39. 


Exact, correct. 


37. 


Pronom personnel conjoint. 



THE STETSON ORACLE 



HERE'S TO STETSON HIGH 



Tune : 'The Gridiron King." — Then Hit the Line for Harvard. 



Let's give a cheer for Randolph, 
And for dear Stetson High ! 
For we love our Alma Mater, 
We would loud her praises cry! 
We must then higher strive, 
With a purpose true, 
To be worthy standard bearers, 
Of our cherished white and blue. 

Then here's a cheer for Randolph, 
And for dear Stetson High ! 
May we loyal be forever, 
That her banner long may fly! 
Schoolmates, let's stand as one, 
For the truth and right, 
That dear S. H. S. may flourish, 
And her honor e'er be bright. 



Compliments of 

C. H. SAUNDERS 

Meats and Provisions 
WHERE ECONOMY RULES 



Compliments of 

WHITE & HILL 

DRY GOODS 

Opposite Post Office Randolph, Mass. 



Compliments of 



Cohen Bros. 



Compliments of 



E. H. Duffy 



Compliments of 



James E. Maloney 



Compliments of 



Thomas Whitty 



McCarthy 

= BARBER = 



30 YEARS IN THE SAME STAND 



F. W. Hayden & Co. 



Jfr 



53 



I 



-r 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



HOOKER BROS. 

Holbrook, Mass. 

Served at Boyle's and Porter s Pharmacy 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



H. G. LYONS 

WHOLESALE CONFECTIONERY 



mailman $c Hattlon (En. 



SUCCESSOR TO 

Qlook $c ©gnbaU GIo. 



Women's, Children's and Infants' Apparel 



BROCKTON, MASS. 
Telephone 4600 



Payne Randolph Garage 

Gray Sales & Service 
Willard Battery Service 

ERNEST H. PAYNE, Prop. 
JOHN C. TRUELSON, Auto Repairing 

elephone 0426-W 659 No. Main Street 



"HOUSES MADE INTO HOMES" 

Whatever you may select from 
our stock ; must be worthy of 
your confidence— else it would 
not be HERE, 

FLAGG & WILLIS 

93 MAIN STREET BROCKTON, MASS. 



Randolph Trust Company 

Founded in 1915 to meet the Banking needs of the Towns of 
Randolph, Holbrook and Avon. 



A strongly established Community Bank, controlled by the 
community which it serves. 

A deposit in the Randolph Trust Company is a safe and sound 
investment and helps to advance the growth and prosperity of Ran- 
dolph, Holbrook and Avon. 

The operating principle in this institution is absolute security 
for the funds of its depositors. 



LOUIS E. FLYE, President PHILIP H. FRAHER, Vice President 

CHARLES D. HILL, Vice President JAMES V. DONOVAN, Treasurer 

JOHN B. BRENNAN, Vice President JAMES H. CALLAHAN. Asst. Treasurer 




The Seal of Safety 



"A Savings Bank Account 
is a long step towards 
Independence." 



RANDOLPH SAVINGS BANK 

ORGANIZED 1851 

HERBERT F. FRENCH, President N. IRVING TOLMAN, Treasurer 

ROLAND H. MARDEN, Asst. Treasurer 



Youthful Charm 



Is Eloquently Expressed in our 
Extensive Assortments of New 

Coats Frocks Gowns Millinery 

Waists Sweaters Skirts 



A Rose and Gray Beauty Shop — Third Floor 




BROCKTON MASSACHUSETTS 



Wishing You the Best of Success 




M? mil &tv&w 



(Successor to Wilson's Studio) 

68 Main Street Brockton, Mass.